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WHAT IS NEOCLASSICISM?

DISCOVERING
THE CLASSICAL PAST

TRAVELERS
IN EUROPE

THE RISE
OF LIBRARIES

FOUNDERS
AND THE CLASSICS

CLASSICAL STORIES

THE USES OF ANTIQUITY

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS



Neoclassicism and America 1750-1900 is a 2016 revision of a digital humanities project made possible by a 2007 grant for Teaching and Learning Resources funded by the Education Division of the National Endowment for the Humanities. This instructional website of seven lessons is a NEH We the People Project designed to advance history and civic excellence in the nation’s schools. It extends topics covered in a NEH-funded Faculty Humanities Workshop for high school teachers on Neoclassicism held at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, in June 2006.

Neoclassicism and America 1750-1900 was a project of the Center for Education Studies and its American Textbook Council. The website contains copyrighted material that constitutes 'fair use' as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. We are grateful to the Musée du Louvre and museum staffs nationwide that have helped with permissions and copyrights of illustrations.

Special thanks for this site go to the many people who have over the years given their time, talent, encouragement, and insights to the project, especially Barbara Ashbrook, Gifford Combs, Stapley Emberling, Richard Fonte, Mary Elena Goodan, Michael Poliakoff, Carl J. Richard, Joachim Schwabe, Edmund Sutro, Richard Wendorf, Caroline Winterer, and David Zeidberg.

Gilbert T. Sewall
Project Director

National Endowments for the HumanitiesWe The People